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a quote from my favorite author

“The most solid advice, though, for a writer is this, I think: Try to learn to breathe deeply, really to taste food when you eat, and when you sleep, really to sleep. Try as much as possible to be wholly alive, with all your might, and when you laugh, laugh like hell, and when you get angry, get good and angry. Try to be alive. You will be dead soon enough.”

-William Saroyan, The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze

Sunday, March 31, 2013

STORY TIME


 
The Slice of Life Challenge is hosted by TWO WRITING TEACHERS

Last night I started reading Being Henry David by Cal Armistead. It begins with a boy who awakes in Penn Station with nothing but a copy of Thoreau’s Walden, a small wound on his head, and a few bucks in his pocket.  He has no idea who he is, no idea how he got there.  I would’ve stayed up all night to finish the story had my burning eyes allowed me to. 

I woke up early this morning just to snatch an hour of reading time before my day began.   I read that the protagonist, who (for lack of memory of his real name) refers to himself as “Henry David.  Son.  Henry Davidson” and is quickly nicknamed “Hank” by a fellow street kid, made his way to Walden Pond in an attempt to buy enough time to regain his memory and avoid the danger of life on the streets.

That’s as far as I got by the time I had to shower and head to the grocery store. 

I stole a few more minutes to read in the backseat of the car when my husband picked up my father-in-law on our way to his sister’s house for an Easter meal.  Hank took refuge in a high school in Concord, Massachusetts and has started to have flashes of memory return to him in painful bursts. 

I peeled myself out of the story long enough to be present for a meal in good company.  I enjoyed doling out my Easter “aunt crap” to our nieces, who have learned that they never know what to expect other than that their gifts will be quirky.  This year, they were lucky enough to find such items as finger mustache tattoos, a bagel yo-yo, owl earrings, owl stickers, Squirmles, and a Fifty Farts deck of cards in their gift bags.  We also always, always give them cash.  The cash is a sort of pay-off in return for allowing me the fun of giving “aunt crap.”

I may have snuck a glance at the book peeking out of my purse while we sat around the table and talked after dinner, after egg coloring, but I did resist the urge to steal away in the corner to find out what happens to Hank.  The tug of spending time with family I don’t see nearly often enough remained more powerful than the pull of the story.

However, now that I am home, in pajamas, with lunches prepped for the week, clothes ironed for tomorrow, grades updated, and plans sketched out, the book patiently resting on the table across the room is drawing me near.  Hank and his story have waited long enough…

8 comments:

  1. Wow - that book really has you captivated! I remember reading Holes by Louis Sachar in one weekend's time. Glad you had a great day and found a great book!

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  2. I'm going to have to add 'Hank' to my TBR list. It sounds like an unusual and riveting story. You've had a full day. It's good to have the reward of a great book to snuggle up with before those burning eyes close again. I've enjoyed your slices this month, Christy!

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  3. Sounds very good, Christy. Happy reading!

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  4. A fulfilling day, every moment well used, balance of social and reading time. I especially admire, that you got everything prepared for next week before continuing reading. This way the story can get your full attention, as did your family before.

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  5. This does sound like a can't put down book. I love the aunt crap idea - my nephews would adore a fifty farts deck!

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  6. Being caught in the web of a book is a tricky place to be when you also have family who requests your presence for a day. I know how the mind wanders back to the book even while being an aunt extraordinaire. I hope you find some more time with your book.

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  7. This was a great post for someone who needs a good story. I wondered how long you were going to go with the story, wanting to know, but yet wanting to read the book myself. It's on my list now. I liked how you looked forward to that book along the way. I cherish books like that when you relish the moment to return to reading. Thanks for the story time, Christy. Henry was one of the names considered if we had a grandson! We dearly wanted to call him Hank!

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  8. You have absolutely hooked me - I've got to find out who Hank is.

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